Our People

People overview

NPSC has a talented team of people who deliver industry-standard phenotypic screening data and facilitate target deconvolution. These results are translated to solve grand challenges in the life sciences, and achieve positive impacts on society and the economy.

Feature Box

Our team is made up of experts from different walks of life, as we are very open-minded about who can contribute positively to our centre. We strongly believe that by adopting an interdisciplinary approach to our research, we can build a centre that is more than the sum of its parts, and better delivers against it goals and aspirations.

Consequently, our scientific team is made up of biologists, informaticians, chemists as well as engineers....and our management team is made up of people from academia, SMEs and big industry. The variety and complementarity of our people fits with our broader philosophy of being flexible in our approach, broad-reaching in our ambitions and collaborative in our actions.

We are also passionate about training and exchange programmes, and have a number of opportunities for students, collaborators from industry, and academic researchers to come and benefit from our facility and learn about the research in and applications of phenotypic screening.

Management Team Title

Management Team

  • Professor Andrew L. Hopkins DPhil FRSC FRSB FLSW

    Professor Andrew L. Hopkins DPhil FRSC FRSB FLSW

    Director NPSC and Chairman PDi

    Professor Andrew L. Hopkins DPhil FRSC FRSB FLSW is the Director of the National Phenotypic Screening Centre (NPSC) and chairman of the Phenomics Discovery initiative (PDi). Andrew was appointed SULSA Research Professor of Translational Biology and Chair of Medicinal Informatics at the University of Dundee in 2007. Andrew’s laboratories include the Biosensor screening lab, the European Lead Factory (Newhouse) and the National Phenotypic Screening Centre and the Medicinal Informatics group (now a spin-out company ex scientia Ltd). He is also a Visiting Professor at the Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford. Prior to founding the NPSC and PDi Andrew served as the Director of SULSA – the Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance. He has won several awards including the BBSRC Commercial Innovator of the Year, Scottish Enterprise Life Science Entrepreneurial Leadership Award, the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Capps Green Zomaya Medal and the Corwin Hansch Award. Andrew spent nearly ten years in the pharmaceutical industry, at the Pfizer, following completion of his DPhil in Biophysics at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Prof Dave Stuart FRS.

    Professor Andrew L. Hopkins DPhil FRSC FRSB FLSW

    Professor Andrew L. Hopkins DPhil FRSC FRSB FLSW

    Director NPSC and Chairman PDi

    Professor Andrew L. Hopkins DPhil FRSC FRSB FLSW is the Director of the National Phenotypic Screening Centre (NPSC) and chairman of the Phenomics Discovery initiative (PDi). Andrew was appointed SULSA Research Professor of Translational Biology and Chair of Medicinal Informatics at the University of Dundee in 2007. Andrew’s laboratories include the Biosensor screening lab, the European Lead Factory (Newhouse) and the National Phenotypic Screening Centre and the Medicinal Informatics group (now a spin-out company ex scientia Ltd). He is also a Visiting Professor at the Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford. Prior to founding the NPSC and PDi Andrew served as the Director of SULSA – the Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance. He has won several awards including the BBSRC Commercial Innovator of the Year, Scottish Enterprise Life Science Entrepreneurial Leadership Award, the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Capps Green Zomaya Medal and the Corwin Hansch Award. Andrew spent nearly ten years in the pharmaceutical industry, at the Pfizer, following completion of his DPhil in Biophysics at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Prof Dave Stuart FRS.

  • Dr Denise Barrault

    Dr Denise Barrault MSc PhD

    Executive Director NPSC

    Dr Denise Barrault was appointed Executive Director of NPSC in November 2015. In this position, she implements NPSC’s strategy to align with university and industry partner’s aspirations to deliver benefits to health and the economy. During her PhD, Denise studied insect antibacterial peptides and their role in Onchocerca spp. transmission in Simuliids at IRAD in Cameroon and at the University of Keele. Denise then started her career at Life Technologies as a team leader in the special oligonucleotides production laboratory, where she developed and optimised novel production and purification methods. Denise went on to do postdoctoral studies at the Institute for Immunology and Infection Research (IIIR) at the University of Edinburgh in Andrew Knight’s laboratory, studying antigen presentation in B cells. Moving back to industry Denise joined Lab901 Ltd., the Scottish based microfluidics and laboratory automation company that developed ScreenTape®, when it was a fledgling start-up (Lab901 is now owned by Agilent Technologies). At Lab901, Denise was a Product Manager and was responsible for ensuring that ScreenTape® products went from concept to market with the customer in mind. She then joined SULSA as Executive Director in 2010, where she implemented SULSA’s strategy across the six member Universities in Scotland. Denise was also responsible for the overall management and promotion of SULSA and established new interactions and collaborations with industry, such as the European Lead Factory and the National Phenotypic Screening Centre. 

    Now reporting to NPSC’s Director: Prof. Andrew Hopkins, Denise is responsible for the overall management, governance and promotion of NPSC as well as the establishment of new interactions and collaborations with industry. 

    Dr Denise Barrault

    Dr Denise Barrault MSc PhD

    Executive Director NPSC

    Dr Denise Barrault was appointed Executive Director of NPSC in November 2015. In this position, she implements NPSC’s strategy to align with university and industry partner’s aspirations to deliver benefits to health and the economy. During her PhD, Denise studied insect antibacterial peptides and their role in Onchocerca spp. transmission in Simuliids at IRAD in Cameroon and at the University of Keele. Denise then started her career at Life Technologies as a team leader in the special oligonucleotides production laboratory, where she developed and optimised novel production and purification methods. Denise went on to do postdoctoral studies at the Institute for Immunology and Infection Research (IIIR) at the University of Edinburgh in Andrew Knight’s laboratory, studying antigen presentation in B cells. Moving back to industry Denise joined Lab901 Ltd., the Scottish based microfluidics and laboratory automation company that developed ScreenTape®, when it was a fledgling start-up (Lab901 is now owned by Agilent Technologies). At Lab901, Denise was a Product Manager and was responsible for ensuring that ScreenTape® products went from concept to market with the customer in mind. She then joined SULSA as Executive Director in 2010, where she implemented SULSA’s strategy across the six member Universities in Scotland. Denise was also responsible for the overall management and promotion of SULSA and established new interactions and collaborations with industry, such as the European Lead Factory and the National Phenotypic Screening Centre. 

    Now reporting to NPSC’s Director: Prof. Andrew Hopkins, Denise is responsible for the overall management, governance and promotion of NPSC as well as the establishment of new interactions and collaborations with industry. 

  • Sir Peter Ratcliffe

    Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe FRS

    Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Head of the TDI

    Sir Peter Ratcliffe grew up in north Lancashire and won an open scholarship to study medicine at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He undertook clinical training at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, and after series of posts at the London postgraduate hospitals, moved to Oxford to train in nephrology. In 1990 he obtained a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellowship to work on cellular responses to hypoxia, retrained in molecular biology and founded a new laboratory working on hypoxia biology in cancer and circulatory diseases. He was appointed Nuffield Professor and Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine in 2003. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Academy of Medical Sciences and is an honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In the 2014 New Year’s Honours List, he was knighted for services to clinical medicine. Professor Ratcliffe teaches diagnostic medicine on the Oxford Clinical course, specialising in real life bedside teaching of diagnosis and management in the acute medical setting.

    Professor Ratcliffe has led the hypoxia biology laboratory at Oxford for more than 20 years. The laboratory discovered the widespread operation of a system of direct oxygen sensing that is conserved throughout the animal kingdom and operates through a novel form of cell signalling involving post-translational hydroxylation of specific amino acids. Catalysis of these hydroxylations requires molecular oxygen and this generates the oxygen-sensitive signal. The laboratory now works extensively with Professor Chris Schofield in Chemistry to define the extent of biological operation and the therapeutic tractability of drug-based manipulation of the system in human disease.

    In 2013 he founded the Target Discovery Institute at Oxford, a £35M initiative that aims to link biomedical discovery research within the University to accurate drug target identification.

    Sir Peter Ratcliffe

    Professor Sir Peter Ratcliffe FRS

    Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Head of the TDI

    Sir Peter Ratcliffe grew up in north Lancashire and won an open scholarship to study medicine at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He undertook clinical training at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, and after series of posts at the London postgraduate hospitals, moved to Oxford to train in nephrology. In 1990 he obtained a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellowship to work on cellular responses to hypoxia, retrained in molecular biology and founded a new laboratory working on hypoxia biology in cancer and circulatory diseases. He was appointed Nuffield Professor and Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine in 2003. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Academy of Medical Sciences and is an honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In the 2014 New Year’s Honours List, he was knighted for services to clinical medicine. Professor Ratcliffe teaches diagnostic medicine on the Oxford Clinical course, specialising in real life bedside teaching of diagnosis and management in the acute medical setting.

    Professor Ratcliffe has led the hypoxia biology laboratory at Oxford for more than 20 years. The laboratory discovered the widespread operation of a system of direct oxygen sensing that is conserved throughout the animal kingdom and operates through a novel form of cell signalling involving post-translational hydroxylation of specific amino acids. Catalysis of these hydroxylations requires molecular oxygen and this generates the oxygen-sensitive signal. The laboratory now works extensively with Professor Chris Schofield in Chemistry to define the extent of biological operation and the therapeutic tractability of drug-based manipulation of the system in human disease.

    In 2013 he founded the Target Discovery Institute at Oxford, a £35M initiative that aims to link biomedical discovery research within the University to accurate drug target identification.

  • Paul Andrews BSc PhD FRSB

    Dr Paul Andrews BSc PhD FRSB

    Director of Operations NPSC

    Paul gained a BSc. Honours Degree in Biochemistry in 1987 and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology in 1991 both from the University of Sheffield, UK. After a short postdoctoral position in infertility research, Paul moved to Dundee in 1993 to take up a series of postdoctoral positions with Michael Stark exploring the molecular genetics and cell biology of key yeast protein phosphorylation pathways. Paul established and ran a deconvolution microscopy facility for a few years then took up a senior postdoctoral position in the lab of Jason Swedlow studying Aurora B kinase. Paul was recruited to the Drug Discovery Unit in Dundee in 2007 to establish a high content screening platform and was team leader in an interdisciplinary but highly commercially-focused academia-industry consortium, pioneering the industrial application of phenotypic screening to identify small molecules that steer stem cell fate. Paul was subsequently recruited to a team leader position at the stem cell company Cellartis AB, funded by Novo Nordisk, to develop chemical tools, reagents and protocols for type-I diabetes cell therapy. In 2012 Paul established a consultancy company, Stem Cell Solutions Ltd, and since 2013 has been working with the Scottish Universities Life Science Alliance (SULSA) to create and subsequently run the National Phenotypic Screening Centre.

    Paul Andrews BSc PhD FRSB

    Dr Paul Andrews BSc PhD FRSB

    Director of Operations NPSC

    Paul gained a BSc. Honours Degree in Biochemistry in 1987 and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology in 1991 both from the University of Sheffield, UK. After a short postdoctoral position in infertility research, Paul moved to Dundee in 1993 to take up a series of postdoctoral positions with Michael Stark exploring the molecular genetics and cell biology of key yeast protein phosphorylation pathways. Paul established and ran a deconvolution microscopy facility for a few years then took up a senior postdoctoral position in the lab of Jason Swedlow studying Aurora B kinase. Paul was recruited to the Drug Discovery Unit in Dundee in 2007 to establish a high content screening platform and was team leader in an interdisciplinary but highly commercially-focused academia-industry consortium, pioneering the industrial application of phenotypic screening to identify small molecules that steer stem cell fate. Paul was subsequently recruited to a team leader position at the stem cell company Cellartis AB, funded by Novo Nordisk, to develop chemical tools, reagents and protocols for type-I diabetes cell therapy. In 2012 Paul established a consultancy company, Stem Cell Solutions Ltd, and since 2013 has been working with the Scottish Universities Life Science Alliance (SULSA) to create and subsequently run the National Phenotypic Screening Centre.

  • Neil Carragher

    Professor Neil Carragher PhD

    Chief Scientific Officer PDI, Director of EPAC

    Neil Carragher graduated from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland UK in 1992 with a B.Sc Honours degree in the subject of “Cell and Immunobiology”. He then took up a position within industry at the Yamanouchi Research Institute, Oxford, England UK where he also gained his PhD. He then held consecutive postdoctoral positions within the Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA and at the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow, Scotland UK. In 2004 Neil returned to the pharmaceutical industry as Principal Scientist with the Advanced Science and Technology Laboratory at AstraZeneca where he pioneered early multiparametric high-content phenotypic screening approaches. In 2010 he once again made the career switch from industry to academia and took up the post of Principal Investigator of Drug Discovery at the University of Edinburgh where he leads a research group and is currently co-director of the Edinburgh Cancer Discovery Unit and the Edinburgh Phenotypic Assay Centre. Primary research interests include advancing High-content analysis, phenotypic screening, Reverse Phase Protein Array technology, drug combinations and cancer drug discovery.

    Neil Carragher

    Professor Neil Carragher PhD

    Chief Scientific Officer PDI, Director of EPAC

    Neil Carragher graduated from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland UK in 1992 with a B.Sc Honours degree in the subject of “Cell and Immunobiology”. He then took up a position within industry at the Yamanouchi Research Institute, Oxford, England UK where he also gained his PhD. He then held consecutive postdoctoral positions within the Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA and at the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow, Scotland UK. In 2004 Neil returned to the pharmaceutical industry as Principal Scientist with the Advanced Science and Technology Laboratory at AstraZeneca where he pioneered early multiparametric high-content phenotypic screening approaches. In 2010 he once again made the career switch from industry to academia and took up the post of Principal Investigator of Drug Discovery at the University of Edinburgh where he leads a research group and is currently co-director of the Edinburgh Cancer Discovery Unit and the Edinburgh Phenotypic Assay Centre. Primary research interests include advancing High-content analysis, phenotypic screening, Reverse Phase Protein Array technology, drug combinations and cancer drug discovery.

  • Daniel Ebner

    Daniel Ebner

    Operational Cell Screening Officer and Group Leader TDI

    Daniel Ebner is a Group Leader and Operational Cell Screening Officer for the Target Discovery Institute (TDI) Cellular High Throughput Screening Facility, University of Oxford. The TDI is a new research centre initiated by the Nuffield Department of Medicine and the University of Oxford employing scientists across several scientific disciplines to focus on drug target discovery, where academia has most to offer in terms of in-depth knowledge of disease mechanisms and pathways necessary for accurate identification of druggable targets. Daniel managed the successful launch of the TDI HTS Facility from inception to a fully functioning facility and is responsible for all daily and long-term strategic operations of the HTS laboratory. To date, the TDI HTS Facility has developed and produced over 40 small compound, RNAi and CRISPR screens ranging in size from small focused libraries to genome-wide screens employing diverse readouts such as high content imaging, qrtPCR, FACS, plate reader (reporter based screens, fluorescence intensity, etc) and NGS. In addition to his academic research experience, Daniel worked as an industrial scientist with Tepnel-LifeCodes Inc. as Head of Robotic Diagnostics where he developed high throughput transplant diagnostic products and at Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, as a research scientist in support of drug development programs.

    Daniel Ebner

    Daniel Ebner

    Operational Cell Screening Officer and Group Leader TDI

    Daniel Ebner is a Group Leader and Operational Cell Screening Officer for the Target Discovery Institute (TDI) Cellular High Throughput Screening Facility, University of Oxford. The TDI is a new research centre initiated by the Nuffield Department of Medicine and the University of Oxford employing scientists across several scientific disciplines to focus on drug target discovery, where academia has most to offer in terms of in-depth knowledge of disease mechanisms and pathways necessary for accurate identification of druggable targets. Daniel managed the successful launch of the TDI HTS Facility from inception to a fully functioning facility and is responsible for all daily and long-term strategic operations of the HTS laboratory. To date, the TDI HTS Facility has developed and produced over 40 small compound, RNAi and CRISPR screens ranging in size from small focused libraries to genome-wide screens employing diverse readouts such as high content imaging, qrtPCR, FACS, plate reader (reporter based screens, fluorescence intensity, etc) and NGS. In addition to his academic research experience, Daniel worked as an industrial scientist with Tepnel-LifeCodes Inc. as Head of Robotic Diagnostics where he developed high throughput transplant diagnostic products and at Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, as a research scientist in support of drug development programs.

Scientific Team Title

Scientific Team

  • Zoe Gage

    Zoe Gage, PhD.

    Screening Scientist

    Zoe gained a BSc (Hons) in molecular biology from the University of St Andrews in 2009 and an MSc in medical microbiology, specialising in virology, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2012. More recently, Zoe completed her PhD in molecular virology at the University of St Andrews where her research focused on the development of cell-based fluorescent assays for use in high-throughput screening. These assays sought to identify novel inhibitors of the interferon response and compounds that modulate the functions of viral interferon antagonists. She is now a Screening Scientist at the NPSC lab in Dundee.

    Zoe Gage

    Zoe Gage, PhD.

    Screening Scientist

    Zoe gained a BSc (Hons) in molecular biology from the University of St Andrews in 2009 and an MSc in medical microbiology, specialising in virology, from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2012. More recently, Zoe completed her PhD in molecular virology at the University of St Andrews where her research focused on the development of cell-based fluorescent assays for use in high-throughput screening. These assays sought to identify novel inhibitors of the interferon response and compounds that modulate the functions of viral interferon antagonists. She is now a Screening Scientist at the NPSC lab in Dundee.

  • Alistair Langlands

    Alistair Langlands, PhD

    Assay Development Scientist

    Alistair graduated from the University of Glasgow with a BSc Honours degree in Genetics in 2008. He then moved to the University of Dundee where he competed a PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology. He then took up consecutive postdoctoral positions within the department of Cell and Developmental Biology, where he worked extensively with and developed phenotypic assays for 3D intestinal organoid cultures. He joined the National Phenotypic Screening Centre where he will work to develop novel phenotypic assays for drug discovery research.

    Alistair Langlands

    Alistair Langlands, PhD

    Assay Development Scientist

    Alistair graduated from the University of Glasgow with a BSc Honours degree in Genetics in 2008. He then moved to the University of Dundee where he competed a PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology. He then took up consecutive postdoctoral positions within the department of Cell and Developmental Biology, where he worked extensively with and developed phenotypic assays for 3D intestinal organoid cultures. He joined the National Phenotypic Screening Centre where he will work to develop novel phenotypic assays for drug discovery research.

  • Emma Gutcher

    Emma Gutcher BSc (Hons)

    Technician

    Emma studied Zoology at the University of Dundee and built a strong background in Bioinformatics during her honours project. She has since supported a range of research groups within the university; specialising in tissue culture within the MRC department and compound management at the Drug Discovery Centre.

    Emma Gutcher

    Emma Gutcher BSc (Hons)

    Technician

    Emma studied Zoology at the University of Dundee and built a strong background in Bioinformatics during her honours project. She has since supported a range of research groups within the university; specialising in tissue culture within the MRC department and compound management at the Drug Discovery Centre.

  • Richard Elliott

    Dr Richard Elliott BSc, PhD

    Research Scientist, EPAC

    Richard completed his PhD in Organic Chemistry at the University of Sydney, Australia in 2000. He then spent over 13 years at the Institute of Cancer Research in London studying the molecular biology & biochemistry of cancer and specialising in high-throughput screening, drug discovery & drug development projects. Richard recently worked at the Children's Cancer Institute, Australia at the University of New South Wales, in their specialist Drug Discovery Centre where his research included characterising novel drug interactions towards new cancer therapies. He joined the Edinburgh Phenotypic Assay Centre in 2016 where he will be working on developing novel phenotypic assays for drug discovery research.

    Richard Elliott

    Dr Richard Elliott BSc, PhD

    Research Scientist, EPAC

    Richard completed his PhD in Organic Chemistry at the University of Sydney, Australia in 2000. He then spent over 13 years at the Institute of Cancer Research in London studying the molecular biology & biochemistry of cancer and specialising in high-throughput screening, drug discovery & drug development projects. Richard recently worked at the Children's Cancer Institute, Australia at the University of New South Wales, in their specialist Drug Discovery Centre where his research included characterising novel drug interactions towards new cancer therapies. He joined the Edinburgh Phenotypic Assay Centre in 2016 where he will be working on developing novel phenotypic assays for drug discovery research.

  • John Raynor

    John Raynor II BSc

    Lead Platform Engineer NPSC

    John earned a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Virginia, USA. After a number of years in IT maintaining Unix systems and networks, he returned to science developing software for protein crystallography. He moved to the University of Oxford in 2009 to a lab engineer position at the Structural Genomics Consortium before being recruited to the University of Dundee to help set up and look after the advanced robotic platforms at the NPSC.

    John Raynor

    John Raynor II BSc

    Lead Platform Engineer NPSC

    John earned a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Virginia, USA. After a number of years in IT maintaining Unix systems and networks, he returned to science developing software for protein crystallography. He moved to the University of Oxford in 2009 to a lab engineer position at the Structural Genomics Consortium before being recruited to the University of Dundee to help set up and look after the advanced robotic platforms at the NPSC.

  • Dahlia Doughty Shenton

    Dr Dahlia Doughty Shenton BSc PhD

    Lead Scientist EPAC

    Dahlia completed a BSc in Chemistry with a concentration in Biochemistry at the University of Richmond, Virginia, USA and a PhD in Biochemistry at Duke University, North Carolina, USA. She pursued postdoctoral research at the Edinburgh Cancer Research UK Centre, of the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, working on high throughput screening as well as the characterisation of targeted chemical inhibitors in pre-clinical and translational development. She now serves as the Lead Scientist of the Edinburgh Phenotypic Assay Centre where she spearheads the development of novel phenotypic assays for drug discovery research.

    Dahlia Doughty Shenton

    Dr Dahlia Doughty Shenton BSc PhD

    Lead Scientist EPAC

    Dahlia completed a BSc in Chemistry with a concentration in Biochemistry at the University of Richmond, Virginia, USA and a PhD in Biochemistry at Duke University, North Carolina, USA. She pursued postdoctoral research at the Edinburgh Cancer Research UK Centre, of the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, working on high throughput screening as well as the characterisation of targeted chemical inhibitors in pre-clinical and translational development. She now serves as the Lead Scientist of the Edinburgh Phenotypic Assay Centre where she spearheads the development of novel phenotypic assays for drug discovery research.

Find out more about Andrew Hopkins' philosophy for modern-day drug discovery.

Find out more about Andrew Hopkins' philosophy for modern drug discovery

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NPSC is a facility run and operated by the Universities of Dundee, Edinburgh and Oxford, which are registered UK-based charities. 

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